Synopsis of the biological data on the loggerhead sea turtle
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Synopsis of the biological data on the loggerhead sea turtle Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758) by C. Kenneth Dodd

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Published by Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior in Washington, DC .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Loggerhead turtle.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby C. Kenneth Dodd, Jr.
SeriesBiological report ;, 88(14) (May 1988), Biological report (Washington, D.C.) ;, 88-14.
ContributionsU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQL666.C536 D63 1988
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 110 p. :
Number of Pages110
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2147664M
LC Control Number88600121

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Synopsis of the Biological Data on the Loggerhead Sea Turtle Caretta caretta (Linnaeus ) by C. Kenneth Dodd, Jr. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Ecology Research Center N.E. 16th Avenue, Room Gainesville, FL FAO Synopsis NMFS Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Department of the Interior Washington, DC Biological Report 88(14).   This synopsis compiles and reviews the available information on the identity, distribution, life history, populations, exploitation, protection, and management of the loggerhead sea turtle Varetta caretta (Linnaeus ) a species threatened by exploitation and the alteration and destruction of its habitat. This synopsis compiles and reviews the available information on the identity, distribution, life history, populations, exploitation, protection, and management of the loggerhead sea turtle Varetta caretta (Linnaeus ) a species threatened by exploitation and the alteration and destruction of its by: Synopsis of the biological data on the loggerhead sea turtle: Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, ).

The loggerhead sea turtle is the world's largest hard-shelled turtle, slightly larger at average and maximum mature weights than the green sea turtle and the Galapagos tortoise. It is also the world's second largest extant turtle after the leatherback sea turtle.[1][2][3] Adults have an average weight range of 80 to kg ( to lb) and a length range of 70 to 95 cm (28 to 37 in). Synopsis of the biological data on the loggerhead sea turtle Caretta caretta (Linnaeus ). Fish and Wildlife Service Biological Report 88(14). Lutz, P.L., and J.A. Musick (eds.). Synopsis of the biological data on the loggerhead sea turtle Caretta caretta (Linnaeus ). Fish and Wildlife Service Biological Report 88(14). Fish and Wildlife Service Biological Report 88(14). The Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) is unique among sea turtles in Ecuador because it haves five pairs of costal shields, and a distinctly reddish brown carapace coloration. Adult males are much smaller than females, have longer and thicker tails, and have enlarged claws on the flippers, which they use to grasp females during copulation.

Saving loggerhead sea turtles also means ensuring that they have the protections afforded to them under the Endangered Species Act. In response to a Center petition, in the federal government declared loggerhead sea turtles in the Pacific an endangered species, upgrading their status from the less-protective "threatened" and recognizing.   The loggerhead sea turtle is the largest hard-shelled turtle in the world. The average adult is about 90 cm (35 in) long and weighs around kg ( lb). However, large specimens may reach cm ( in) and kg ( lb). Hatchlings are brown or black, while adults have yellow or brown skin and reddish brown shells. Synopsis of the biological data on the loggerhead sea turtle Caretta caretta (Linnaeus ). Biological Report of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, 88, 1 – Eckert, K.L., The loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta), is a species of oceanic turtle distributed throughout the world. It is a marine reptile, belonging to the family average loggerhead measures around 90 cm (35 in) in carapace length when fully grown. The adult loggerhead sea turtle weighs approximately kg ( lb), with the largest specimens weighing in at more than kg (1, lb).